All we are saying is give chance a chance


Evidence of how subjective likes and dislikes skew classical music programming comes in the form of a listener’s analysis of the music broadcast on BBC Radio 3 in 2012. The full analysis is here, and the results show that despite Radio 3 being on air for 8784 hours in the year it did not broadcast any music at all by Kurt Atterberg, Hans Eisler, Roy Harris, K A Hartmann, Theodor Kirchner, Joonas Kokkonen, Franz Krommer, Franz Lachner, Maurice Ohana, Goffredo Petrassi, Christopher Rouse, Hilding Rosenberg, Robert Simpson, Ernst Toch and Malcolm Williamson - that choice of significant omissions is the analyst's not mine. By contrast the report says the "worrying trend" of an increase in popular repertoire continued; this included ninety-three broadcasts of both Dvořák Slavonic Dances and Debussy Preludes. Quite a strong case for giving chance a chance.

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Comments

JMW said…
So many riches in your photo detail! It makes one want to stay home for a week and do nothing but "blind" listen from one's own collection.

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