Imagine what listening to the wrong music can do to you


That photo shows me putting my body where my mouth is and experiencing Nāda yoga - sound yoga - at the hands of radiesthenia practitioner Heidrun Kimm on Crete. Radiesthesia is the interaction between the vibrational fields of the human body and external objects, and the photo first appeared in a post last year which discussed what John Luther Adams describes as ""the strange power of noise". An earlier post had highlighted the little-understood importance of ultrasound, the sound at frequencies above the upper frequency limit of the ear, while another post described how medical research has shown that audiences become what they listen to. On the same path, my tribute to Jonathan Harvey last week touched on quantum field theory and postulated that the vibrating energy of music can transform the brain and, as a result, can transform lives. Just five days later the BBC ran a story reporting that doctors at a leading London hospital have used non-invasive ultrasound to operate deep inside the brain. In that story a leading neurosurgeon stated that ultrasound brain surgery had an "enormous future" and could be used to treat other movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease. I am indebted to Winnipeg Classic FM presenter Paul von Wichert for prompting this post, and for his Facebook comment of 'Imagine what listening to the "wrong" kind of music can do to you!'

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