Instant Karma


Trying to find a middle way solution to Brexit now seems to be futile. But two Buddhist perspectives, both dating from the immediate post-referendum period, provide valuable perspectives. Buddhism without beliefs advocate Stephen Batchelor made the case for remaining in the EU in Tricyle magazine, to which his colleague at Bodhi College Michael Hoey responded with the case for leaving. Both are long and thought-provoking reads which are unlikely to be given any consideration by the fanatics on both sides who are hurling 280 characters of abuse at each other on social media. Which is sad, because Michael Hoey delivers the following crucially important message:
We need to retain goodwill towards those we disagree with and actually try to find out what they are saying, respecting their integrity and good intentions. We need to avoid exaggeration and stereotyping. In the secular democracy that Stephen [Batchelor] espouses freethinking individuals are bound to differ. Diversity includes conservatism.
That was written in March 2017 and Michael Hoey's advice clearly has not been heeded. So, staying in the same metaphysical realms, it is not unreasonable to suggest that the imminent Brexit disaster is simply instant karma for the inauspicious behaviour of both the 'remain' and 'leave' movements.

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