The beauty of disaster

We are all part of a game. We are the pawns in the chess game. I take it for granted that I am so distant from the masses. However, I am just a small cog in the clockwork of this system of humanity. I am being indoctrinated by our society and surroundings. I refuse to believe that many of my thoughts, of which I am so proud, have been implanted by my surroundings. I ask myself how the people of the masses can have been so foolish, so oblivious of what was going on around them, as to do what they are told without thought. How can I say that I am not falling into a rut like that myself? This is only the start for more questions to come.
That extract is taken from an essay by a second year student in the newsletter of Brockwood Park School, which was founded by Jiddu Krishnamurti. Questioning like that coming from a young person provides some hope that all is not lost. Graphic is the cover art* for J. Peter Schwalm's album The Beauty of Disaster. This is currently high in my playlist despite the unfortunate Stockhausenesque resonances of the title; audition its eclectic electronica via this link. Track 2 Himmelfahrt sample's Wagner's Tristan and that provides a neat link across to the J.Peter Schwalm curated Wagner Transformed, an album that is recommended for those who like their beyond the comfort zone experiences to have familiar points of reference.

* Album artwork is from Glass Study Series 1 by Sophie Clements. No review samples used. Any copyrighted material is included as "fair use" for critical analysis only, and will be removed at the request of copyright owner(s). Also on Facebook and Twitter.

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