Now they know how many holes it takes to fill the Albert Hall

There's a story about a Sufi master who was walking with one of his pupils, near a huge field. In the field there was a man who was digging holes. This man had dug two hundred holes two feet deep. Observing this the pupil, the pupil asked, "O my master, what is he doing?".
"I don't know. Let us ask him," the Sufi answered. They called him over, and asked what was the purpose of digging so many holes just two feet deep.
"I'm looking for water," the man said. The Sufi master told him, "It's unlikely that you will find water by digging two hundred holes that are only two feet deep. You have a better chance of finding water if you dig one hole two hundred feet deep.
That Sufi teaching* came to mind when I read details of the 2015 BBC Proms. Header photo was taken a few days ago outside the Zaouia Moulay Idriss II in Fez, Morocco, where I was attending the Sufi culture festival.

*Sufi tale is adapted from When You Hear Hoofbeats Think of a Zebra: Talks on Sufism by Shems Friedlander. Any copyrighted material is included as "fair use" for critical analysis only and will be removed at the request of copyright owner(s).Also on Facebook and Twitter.

Comments

Recent popular posts

How to reach a big new post-COVID classical audience

I put a spell on you

Requiem for my vinyl

Untold story of the counterculture's Islamic connection

Vonnegut gets his Dresden facts wrong

Berlin Philharmonic's first woman conductor

Classical music must face the facts - click bait pays

The Berlin Philharmonic's darkest hour

Benjamin Brittten's relationship with children

Classical music has many saviours