Classical radio loses yet more audience


In response to my earlier post How classical music found a flourishing new audience a reader has pointed out the following news item:
A court in Diss, Norfolk yesterday heard how a police raid last August on a smallholding near Thetford uncovered a cannabis factory. Giving evidence Detective Sergeant Peel said that more than 200 plants were found in the raided premises. Peter Storling age 42 from Tottington pleaded not guilty to producing a banned substance for sale on the grounds that the majority of the plants were dead. Storling explained that he read a New Zealand press report describing how cannabis plants flourished when played classical music. So he played his plants BBC Radio 3 all day, with the result seen in the photo above. The hearing continues today.
As Brion Gysin said 'Nothing is true but everything is permitted'; however the true photo comes via Rhymes & Politics. Any copyrighted material on these pages is included as "fair use", for the purpose of study, review or critical analysis only, and will be removed at the request of copyright owner(s). Also on Facebook and Twitter.

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