A stream of glorious music

'I think there is a great deal in The Kingdom that is more than a match for Gerontius, and I feel that it is a much more balanced work and throughout maintains a stream of glorious music whereas Gerontius has its ups and downs.'
That is from Sir Adrian Boult's introductory note to his 1969 recording of The Kingdom and after writing yesterday's post about mystical devotion I listened once again to Elgar's oratorio. Sir Adrian's high regard for The Kingdom is reflected in his interpretation - his recording is probably the finest achievement of the EMI dream team of Boult, Bishop and Parker, although their Pilgrim's Progress runs it a close second. Forget about Elgar the flag waving patriot, he was a Catholic and it was only twenty-eight years before he was born that Catholic emancipation became law in England. Instead follow these links to Elgar the mystic and Elgar the occultist.

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Comments

Pliable said…
Tim Page comments via Facebook - My favorite Elgar work, without a doubt.

http://new.oberlin.edu/office/rubininstitute/critics/tim-page.dot
Gavin Plumley said…
I don't think Boult needed to do down Gerontius in order to praise The Kingdom... but he's write that there is glorious music in it. Just been convinced myself, albeit by another recording.

http://entartetemusik.blogspot.com/2012/01/hearing-elgars-faith.html
Nick Miliokas said…
"Write" on, Mr. Plumly, "write" on.

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