Art cannot ignore what is joyful

Art disconnected from suffering is thought by some impoverished on account of its apparent failure to face up to the genuinely tragic episodes of life. Yet there remains a serious risk that in the name of a dubious artistic authenticity we may inhumanly reject all harking back, and, in so doing, cut ourselves off from important facets of art's joyfulness - some of it not unconnected with cosiness. Good art, it is undeniable, ought to engage in due measure with the more painful aspects of life, but it cannot, without denaturing itself, wholly ignore what is joyful and comfortable, even if such an engagement be achieved via indulgence of nostalgia.
From Piers Tattersall's programme note for the world premiere of his Kreisler, l'entre deux guerres which is being given by Henning Kraggerud and the Britten Sinfonia. Header image is from the London Children's Ballet production of Piers Tattersall's Rumpelstiltskin. Philippa Schuyler's 1946 debut as composer and soloist with the New York Philharmonic included her Rumpelstiltskin Scherzo. More on that concert in Philippa Schuyler - genius or genetic experiment.

Piers Tattersall's programme note is available online until October 14. Kreisler, l'entre deux guerres is a commission by the Britten Sinfonia with support and funding from the William Alwyn Foundation and RVW Trust. Photo credit London Children's Ballet. Any copyrighted material on these pages is included as "fair use", for the purpose of study, review or critical analysis only, and will be removed at the request of copyright owner(s). Report broken links, missing images and errors to - overgrownpath at hotmail dot co dot uk Also on Facebook and Twitter.

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