No one had left a violin or piano

Diaghilev and Stravinsky were next to each other. At Diaghilev's tomb a similar process of appropriation was in operation. Pens had been left at the poet Joseph Brodsky's grave; here, people had left ballet shoes. There were three in total, three halves of three pairs, two left and one right. Lots of messages too. Stravinsky's tomb was bare. No one had left a violin or piano or anything.
Isola di San Michele described in Geoff Dyer's novel Jeff in Venice, Death in Varanasi. Photo shows Stravinsky's funeral cortege approaching San Michele, April 15, 1971. No one left a violin or piano, but in Paris someone left a cello.

This post is available via Twitter @overgrownpath. Jeff in Venice, Death in Varanasi was borrowed from Norwich Millenium Library. Any copyrighted material on these pages is included as "fair use", for the purpose of study, review or critical analysis only, and will be removed at the request of copyright owner(s). Report errors to - overgrownpath at hotmail dot co dot uk

Comments

Pliable said…
The following comment has been posted to the linked article about Arman's grave in Père Lachaise in Paris. It is a perfect example of the priceless paths that readers create, so I am repeating it here:

Mess Noone has left a new comment on your post "In the shadow of Chopin":

Arman was, of course, married to composer Eliane Radigue, still vastly underrated outside specialist circles:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eliane_Radigue
Pliable said…
Some audio files here:

http://www.kalvos.org/radigue.html
Anonymous said…
Please notice that the name of the poet is Joseph Brodsky, not Jacob.
Thank you.
Pliable said…
Aklyon, now corrected.

Thanks.

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