The Perfect Wagnerite

The qualities in him that specially appealed to youth were his irreverence for tradition and office, his indifference to vested interests and inflated reputations, his contempt for current morality, his championship of unpopular causes and persecuted people, his vitality and humour, and above all his inability to take solemn people seriously.
Hesketh Pearson on George Bernard Shaw (above), who was born on July 26, 1856. GBS trivia -he is the only person to have been awarded both the Nobel Prize for Literature (1925) and an Oscar (1938). These were for his contributions to literature and for his work on the film Pygmalion, respectively. Shaw on Elgar here.

Any copyrighted material on these pages is included as "fair use", for the purpose of study, review or critical analysis only, and will be removed at the request of copyright owner(s). Report errors to - overgrownpath at hotmail dot co dot uk

Comments

Pliable said…
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/london/8169297.stm
Schmüdde said…
Thanks for posting this - I'm inspired to use Pygmalion in my film survey class this quarter. It will be a great movie for my students to study.
Anonymous said…
A less rosy view of Shaw here. See the YouTube clips especially. But I give him his due on Elgar.

http://davidderrick.wordpress.com/2009/05/28/the-silliness-of-george-bernard-shaw/

Recent popular posts

I have seen the future and it is cardboard

New classical audiences need new music

Towards infinite potential

Classical music must woke up and smell the coffee

Have all the really great musicians come and gone?

When classical musicians fought against tuxedo fascism

Virtue signalling does not sell concert tickets

Four great albums that are victims of clickbait correctness

Who is this Worgan Williams?