Spin Symphony


Maximum spin for the appearance of Sir Malcolm Arnold's A Grand, Grand Overture at the last night of the 2009 BBC Proms.

Minimum spin for the continuing absence of Sir Malcolm Arnold's symphonies from the BBC Proms. The last time one was performed was 1994. It was his Second Symphony. But the appearance in the 2009 season of E. J. Moerans Symphony in G minor does compensate in a small way.

Details of the 2009 BBC Proms here. The story of Sir Malcolm Arnold's neglected symphony here.

Portrait of Sir Malcolm by June Mendoza. Any copyrighted material on these pages is included as "fair use", for the purpose of study, review or critical analysis only, and will be removed at the request of copyright owner(s). Report errors to - overgrownpath at hotmail dot co dot uk

Comments

Drew80 said…
Pliable, is the Naxos set of complete Arnold symphonies any good? I never bothered to buy it.

Oddly enough, I have a Conifer disc—long out of print—with both Arnold works you mention in this post. I recall “A Grand, Grand Overture” as amusing. I recall the Symphony No. 2 as unmemorable.

Of course, that doesn’t mean I am right on either count!

Arnold’s music gets virtually no exposure here. Even the various sets of nationalist dances are very seldom played, although I am told they used to get occasional airings.
Pliable said…
Drew, the Naxos set of the Arnold symphonies is excellent, as are the Chandos and Decca (Conifer) sets. There is little to choose between them. But a quick look suggests availability is erratic for all of them. As all three sets are excellent I would be guided by price, and, of course, availability.

Well worth exploring if the price is right. And surely worth programming one at the BBC Proms instead of one of four more Shostakovich symphonies in the 2009 season?

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