Come, come, whoever you are


One picture is worth a thousand words... That photo was taken in Casablanca on Tuesday and the soloists are sopranos Tatiana Probst and Elise Haddad, and tenor Smahi El Harrati. They are singing a specially commissioned arrangement of Schubert's Ave Maria blending Aramaic, Latin and Arabic texts. Conducting l'Orchestre Philharmonique du Maroc in the opening concert of the Moroccan orchestras annual 'Unity of religions' celebration is the intrepid Olivier Holt. The photo by Brahim Taougar appears in the Femmes du Maroc online review. Coupled with the Schubert was the Moroccan premiere of Mahler's Fifth Symphony. 'Standing ovation pour l’Orchestre Philharmonique du Maroc en ouverture de sa saison' is the headline for the review. The Moroccan band may not be the Berlin Philharmonic or even the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra, and Olivier Holt is not trending on Twitter. But as the inscription over the tomb of Sufi saint Mevlana Rumi in Konya, Turkey exhorts:

Come, come, whoever you are,
Wanderer, worshiper, lover of leaving.
It doesn’t matter.
Ours is not a caravan of despair.
Come, even if you have broken your vows a thousand times.
Come, yet again, come, come.

New Overgrown Path posts are available via RSS/email by entering your email address in the right-hand sidebar. Photo is by Brahim Taougar and comes via the Femmes du Maroc online magazine. Any copyrighted material is included for critical analysis, and will be removed at the request of copyright owner(s).

Comments

Pliable said…
But, sadly, some still still refuse to heed Rumi's wisdom- https://en.yabiladi.com/articles/details/76654/2016-moroccan-scholar-ahmed-raissouni.html

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