Friday, October 09, 2009

Play it again Sam


"... his campaign had given legitimacy to the cause of peace" - from the notes for Naxos' recording of Arnold Rosner's Fifth Symphony. In his notes the composer was referring to Democrat George McGovern's unsuccessful campaign against Richard Nixon in the 1972 presidential election.

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3 comments:

Garth Trinkl said...

Concerning American conductor John McLaughlin Williams’s new Naxos recording of American composer Arnold Rosner’s post-romantic Symphony No. 5 'Missa sine Cantoribus super Salve regina' from 1973, I’m going to have to check to see whether Sharon Rockefeller’s Classical WETA-FM is programming it this evening here in Washington, D.C. Lately, their commitment to American classical music seems to be obsessively focused on repeat, tokenist broadcasts of Louis Moreau Gottschalk’s symphonic “A Night in the Tropics” with the announcers usually giggling and making references to too much rum and little paper umbrellas.

I’m also going to have to listen to Hans Werner Henze’s Fifth Symphony again, but I did recently listen to Henze’s Symphony #6, which was composed in Havana, Cuba, and which was included in the DG “Twentieth Century Classics” 1973 compilation of the Henze’s first six symphonies. Unlike the first five symphonies recorded with the Berlin Philharmonic, the Sixth was recorded by DG with Henze leading the London Symphony Orchestra. (It features two chamber orchestras, and may - or may not - have been influenced by Elliott Carter – and/or John Cage.)

I remember being fascinated, in college in the 1970s, by new LP releases in the library of Henze’s “El Cimarron” and “The Raft of the Medusa.” Strangely, even though I now have both of these works on CD, I’ve only listened to “Raft of the Medusa” once, a long while back; and I haven’t opened “El Cimarron.” Aesthetically, surely this has been my loss.

Pliable said...

This comment was posted by Garth Trinkl to my original article on the Arnold Rosner symphony. I am repeating it here as it is relevant:

Concerning American conductor John McLaughlin Williams’s new Naxos recording of American composer Arnold Rosner’s post-romantic Symphony No. 5 'Missa sine Cantoribus super Salve regina' from 1973, I’m going to have to check to see whether Sharon Rockefeller’s Classical WETA-FM is programming it this evening here in Washington, D.C. Lately, their commitment to American classical music seems to be obsessively focused on repeat, tokenist broadcasts of Louis Moreau Gottschalk’s symphonic “A Night in the Tropics” with the announcers usually giggling and making references to too much rum and little paper umbrellas.

I’m also going to have to listen to Hans Werner Henze’s Fifth Symphony again, but I did recently listen to Henze’s Symphony #6, which was composed in Havana, Cuba, and which was included in the DG “Twentieth Century Classics” 1973 compilation of the Henze’s first six symphonies. Unlike the first five symphonies recorded with the Berlin Philharmonic, the Sixth was recorded by DG with Henze leading the London Symphony Orchestra. (It features two chamber orchestras, and may - or may not - have been influenced by Elliott Carter – and/or John Cage.)

I remember being fascinated, in college in the 1970s, by new LP releases in the library of Henze’s “El Cimarron” and “The Raft of the Medusa.” Strangely, even though I now have both of these works on CD, I’ve only listened to “Raft of the Medusa” once, a long while back; and I haven’t opened “El Cimarron.” Aesthetically, surely this has been my loss.

http://renaissanceresearch.blogspot.com/

The Wound Dresser said...

doesn't the first movement sound similar to R. V.Wiliams Thomas Tallis ??